Home/Stay Informed/All Diocesan Articles

All Diocesan Articles

Answering the Divine Call 

Posted on March 27, 2024 in: Reflections, Lent

Answering the Divine Call 

The Risen Lord knows us so very intimately, calling each of us by name. In our sinfulness, imperfection and unworthiness, we are not abandoned.
 

 

In the Easter story, a meaningful and very vulnerable exchange occurs between Mary Magdalene and the Risen Lord, as depicted in the Gospel of John (20:11-18).

 

In the quiet solitude of a garden, Mary Magdalene stands, tears staining her cheeks, grief echoing in her heart. The tomb of Jesus looms before her, a silent witness to the profound loss that seems insurmountable. It is in this very moment of despair that a subtle shift occurs… a knowing that transcends the physical realm.

 

As Mary weeps, a figure stands behind her, a presence she fails to recognize until a single word pierces the heavy air, one filled with familiarity and divine resonance: “Mary." 

 

In that moment, the Risen Lord calls her by name, unraveling the shroud of sorrow that envelops her. 

 

What did His voice sound like? Was it a gentle melody? A familiar cadence that only she could recognize? Or a resonant call to capture her attention? The knowing. In that sacred instant, Mary realizes the profound truth: the One standing before her is not a stranger, not a gardener, but the Resurrected Teacher, the embodiment of hope and eternal life. She turned to Him and cried out, “Rabboni!”

 

The intimacy of that exchange lingers— a Divine dialogue that transcends time and resonates within the depths of each of our souls. 

 

This Easter, we are invited to reflect on this profound encounter. Mary’s tears in the garden transformed into joy, a revelation that the Risen Lord knows us so very intimately, calling each of us by name. It is a reminder that, in our sinfulness, imperfection, and unworthiness, we are not abandoned. 

 

The Lord beckons us with a love that transcends our shortcomings, inviting us to immerse ourselves in the sacred cleansing of His blood, to be reborn anew. 

 

No matter how many times we stumble, no matter how heavy the weight of our failures, His voice resounds, tenderly calling us to rise, to answer the call of redemption. 

 

It is the knowing— a deep, personal knowing that echoes in our souls. In the midst of our struggles, the Lord calls us, not with condemnation, but with an unwavering love that seeks to mend, to heal, and to resurrect. Like Mary, we need only to answer, to turn towards the voice that knows us intimately and offers the promise of renewal. 

 

This Easter, let Mary Magdalene's encounter be a reminder that even in the midst of our weeping, the Risen Lord calls us each by name. May we, like Mary, become messengers of this profound truth, proclaiming to the world, "I have seen the Lord." +

 

By Andrea DePaola


Most Viewed Articles of the Last 30 Days

Oh Happy Day!

Posted on March 28, 2024 in: Reflections

1381

Oh Happy Day!
Some years ago, a Gospel song made the top 10 charts, it was called “Oh Happy Day.” The refrain of the song is, “Oh happy day, oh happy day, when Jesus washed my sins away.” The “happy day” is Good Friday, because that is the day when Jesus brings salvation to humanity by His Passion and death on the cross. But for Christians, there is an even happier day, the day when He is risen: Easter Sunday. As Catholic Christians, we are, of course, a people of the Eucharist, and a people of the living Word of God. But primarily, we are an Easter...

Read More

Answering the Divine Call 

Posted on March 27, 2024 in: Reflections, Lent

937

Answering the Divine Call 
The Risen Lord knows us so very intimately, calling each of us by name. In our sinfulness, imperfection and unworthiness, we are not abandoned.     In the Easter story, a meaningful and very vulnerable exchange occurs between Mary Magdalene and the Risen Lord, as depicted in the Gospel of John (20:11-18).   In the quiet solitude of a garden, Mary Magdalene stands, tears staining her cheeks, grief echoing in her heart. The tomb of Jesus looms before her, a silent witness to the profound loss that seems insurmountable. It is in this very...

Read More

Bishop Cote Discusses Faith and Redemption in Palm Sunday Homily
"We celebrate this Palm Sunday with the eyes of faith,"   On Sunday, March 24th, the Cathedral of Saint Patrick was filled with the faithful, gathered to commemorate Palm Sunday, marking the beginning of Holy Week. The Most Reverend Michael R. Cote presided over the Mass, delivering a homily that captured the profound significance of the sacred day. He drew parallels between the disciples' initial inability to grasp the full significance of Christ's entry into Jerusalem and our celebration of Palm Sunday. He emphasized...

Read More

There's Still Time to Receive a Plenary Indulgence During Lent
Did you know that there are several ways you can gain a plenary indulgence during Lent? There are actually four ways you can receive one. Even though Lent is nearly over, there is still plenty of time for you to complete any, or all, of these.    First of all, what is a plenary indulgence? A plenary indulgence is a grace granted by the Catholic Church through the merits of Jesus Christ to remove the temporal punishment due to sin. The indulgence cleanses a person of all temporal punishment due to sin. However, it must always be accompanied by a full detac...

Read More

“Peace be with you!” - Bishop Cote's 2024 Easter Message
  Easter Message 2024   My dear sisters and brothers in the Lord, The peace of the risen Lord be with you and all whom you love. On this Easter Sunday, we rejoice in the Lord’s victory over sin and death. Assembled with their companions, the Eleven apostles first heard the good news of Jesus’ Resurrection. While they were discussing all this, Jesus stands among them. In their fright, in their guilt, and in their wonderment and awe, the Risen Lord greets them, “Peace be with you!” (cf. Luke 24:36-37) While the mere sight of Je...

Read More

Sharing in Our Humanity

Posted on April 07, 2024 in: Reflections

134

Sharing in Our Humanity
At Mass, the deacon is the minister of the cup. He prepares the chalice of wine and elevates the cup of blessing with the priest in his elevation of the host.  It always humbles me when I pray the Prayer of Preparation for the chalice: “By the mystery of this water and wine, may we come to share in the divinity of Christ, who humbled himself to share in our humanity.” The prayer is said quietly while pouring the wine and a drop of water into the chalice. Many people in the pews may not even be aware of the prayer being said. The wine represents Jesus&rsq...

Read More

Annual Catholic Appeal

ACA DONATE

English

Español

 

 
Signup for Weekly Newsletter


    Recently Added Galleries
    Click to view album: Nativity photos
    Click to view album: Archbishop Kevin S. Randall - Episcopal Ordination, Nov. 4, 2023
    Click to view album: Rite of Election
    Click to view album: Mass of Ordination  for Fr. Jacob Ramos
    Latest Articles
    Love for God - Our Lady Queen of Hope Award
    'This is a Gift for You' - Hope & Faith Video Series
    Paths to the Cross- Journeys into the Heart of Catholicism
    The Secret Weapon to a Stronger Marriage
    A Question of Faith- What is Papal Infallibility?
    Sharing in Our Humanity
    Family and Community Are Key to Overcoming Secularism, Pope Says
    Calendar of Events

    Roman Catholic Diocese of Norwich
    201 Broadway
    Norwich, CT 06360-4328
    Phone: 860-887-9294